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Thursday, July 12, 2012

Guns of the Timberlands

Finished reading Guns of the Timberlands by Louis L'Amour. A gent by the name of Jud Devitt has his eye set on the timber in Deep Creek, but the land is occupied by Clay Bell. The way this started out gave me the impression that Jud Devitt was going to be the hero in the white hat, but that soon changed to Clay Bell when Devitt tries to force his way into Deep Creek to have a go at the timber. Mr. Bell is a forward thinker and thwarts every attempt by Devitt to get through to the timber, even though he has the local banker supporting him. The romantic interest for both men is the Judge's daughter, Colleen Riley, who came west with Devitt and her father. So, on top of the timber, both Bell and Devitt try to get on top of Colleen, and it takes to the bitter end to find out who the winner is with plenty of hints on the way. Devitt gets a government grant to the timber, but a couple of people are killed trying to get through Bell's defenses. Bell also has a government grant for grazing on the land, and he retaliates, killing a couple of Devitt's men. Devitt hires a couple of slick gunslingers to kill Bell, but they get shot instead, and it comes to a barefisted, knockdown, dragout fight between Bell and Devitt well described by Mr. L'Amour to determine the winner. By that time you know very well who the winner will be and the conqueror of Miss Riley.

This was a fairly short novel of 148 pages in the pocket book edition by Bantam Books. A satisfying read.

11 comments:

  1. Still like reading L'Amour, seems like a lot of western readers are bashing him these days. I must have read this one but I do not remember it. May try it again at only 148 pages.

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    1. Oh, yes, one of those. Just as good the second time.

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  2. I tell you I used to really enjoy books about that length. Good quick reads. I still do in fact. Books are way too long most of the time today.

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    1. A lot of them are, like War and Peace.

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    2. Too many books these days are definitely too long and in my opinion a lot of it is just padding with no substance.

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  3. This book has been lying in my cabinet for nearly two years and I haven't got around to reading it still. If I remember correctly, barefisted fights are a common sight in L'Amour's novels. I need to read this one quick and then some of his other novels too.

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    1. As an ex-boxer, I think he liked the bare-knuckle confrontations in his manuscripts.

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  4. Classic 50's L'Amour!

    You know they filmed that one? with tab hunter, i read... never saw it, though.

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    1. Me neither. Didn't know it had been filmed.

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  5. I recently picked this off my L'Amour shelf and started reading it again. Even though I know what happens, it's still an enjoyable read. I'm also reading Son Of A Wanted Man for the third time in twenty years. I'd definitely recommend it if you're looking for another LL to read.

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    1. I have a couple more in my TBR box, but not Son of a Wanted Man. Maybe I'll run across it at a used book store. Nice to hear from you, Joanne.

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